Effects of Lecithin and Vitamin E Supplementation on Liver Steatosis and Oxidative Stress Induced by Chronic Ethanol Consumption in Rats

  • Sheila Cristina de Lima Sanches 1Nutrition and Metabolism Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto and Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo
  • Guilherme Vannucchi Portari Nutrition and Metabolism Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo
  • Rafael Deminice Nutrition and Metabolism Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo
  • Sérgio Zucoloto Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo
  • Paula Garcia Chiarello Nutrition and Metabolism Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo
  • Helio Vannucchi Nutrition and Metabolism Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo
  • Alceu Afonso Jordão

Abstract

Oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, associated with ethanol, are considered important pathogenic  mechanisms in the formation of hepatic steatosis. The objective of the present study was to assess the  effects of supplementation with lecithin and vitamin E on the oxidatives stress and hepatic steatosis induced  in rats by chronic ethanol consumption. Fifty-two Wistar rats were divided into 4 experimental groups:  control (AIN-93 diet), ethanol group (control diet plus a 20% hydroalcoholic solution), ethanol + vitamin  E group (addition of 0.6% vitamin E to the diet plus a 20% hydroalcoholic solution); ethanol + soy lecithin  group (addition of 5 % soy lecithin to the diet plus a 20% hydroalcoholic solution). At the end of 4 weeks  the animals were sacrificed. The results showed a significantly smaller number of animals (p < 0.05)  classified as having a low degree of steatosis in the ethanol + vitamin E group and ethanol + soy lecithin  group compared to the ethanol group. In addition, the ethanol + soy lecithin group had a significantly  lower concentration of hepatic fat (p < 0.05) than the ethanol group. A significant reduction of hepatic  TBARS concentration (p < 0.05) was detected in the ethanol + vitamin E group compared to the ethanol  group. Hepatic carbonyl concentration was significantly lower in the ethanol + soy lecithin group. However,  hepatic GSH was significantly lower in the ethanol + vitamin E and ethanol + soy lecithin groups compared  to the control group. In conclusion, supplementation with lecithin and vitamin E attenuated the hepatotoxic  effects of chronic ethanol intake and contributed to a reduction of the progression of steatosis status. 

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